Virtual Tours | Destinations | You Go Culture

Each destination is developed on the basis of its important cultural heritage (Myth) and its contemporary life (Experience). Points of Interest (POI) are recorded, having as a reference point archaeological sites or places of cultural/ touristic significance. Just click on your point of interest and start your journey. Get insights and tips, inspire yourself and enjoy a unique journey!

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Found: An Iraqi City, Established by Alexander the Great and Forgotten for Millennia – Atlas Obscura

Satellite and drone photos clued archaeologists to its existence.

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Much ado about nothing: ancient Indian text contains earliest zero symbol | Science | The Guardian

Exclusive: one of the greatest conceptual breakthroughs in mathematics has been traced to the Bakhshali manuscript, dating from the 3rd or 4th century

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The Ancient Greeks May Have Deliberately Built Temples on Fault Lines – Atlas Obscura

Then again, they may just have an awful lot of both.

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This ancient Babylonian tablet may contain the first evidence of trigonometry | Science | AAAS

Trigonometry, the study of the lengths and angles of triangles, sends most modern high schoolers scurrying to their cellphones to look up angles, sines, and cosines. Now, a fresh look at a 3700-year-old clay tablet suggests that Babylonian mathematicians not only developed the first trig table, beating the Greeks to the punch by more than 1000 years, but that they also figured out an entirely new way to look at the subject. However, other experts on the clay tablet, known as Plimpton 322 (P322), say the new work is speculative at best.

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Israeli archaeologists uncover rare 1,500-year-old mosaic

JERUSALEM (Reuters) – A 1,500-year-old mosaic floor with a Greek inscription has been uncovered during works to install communications cables in Jerusalem’s Old City – a rare discovery of an ancient relic and an historic document in one.

The inscription cites 6th-century Roman emperor Justinian as well as Constantine, who served as abbot of a church founded by Justinian in Jerusalem. Archaeologists believe it will help them to understand Justinian’s building projects in the city.

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Borgring: 1000-year-old Viking fortress uncovered in Denmark | The Independent

A 10th-Century Viking fortress has been discovered by archaeologists in Denmark.  The circular structure was found at Borgring, to the west of the country, in 2014, but now new tests have revealed it was likely to have been built by King Harald Bluetooth Gormsson. The structure was built in a perfect circle and is the fifth Viking castle to be discovered in the country since the 1930s.

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