What machines can tell from your face

Life in the age of facial recognition

THE human face is a remarkable piece of work. The astonishing variety of facial features helps people recognise each other and is crucial to the formation of complex societies. So is the face’s ability to send emotional signals, whether through an involuntary blush or the artifice of a false smile. People spend much of their waking lives, in the office and the courtroom as well as the bar and the bedroom, reading faces, for signs of attraction, hostility, trust and deceit. They also spend plenty of time trying to dissimulate.

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If You Want to Remember Something, Don’t Take a Picture

Last month I went to Outside Lands, a 3-day music festival in San Francisco where musical artists from pretty much every genre out there performed on a bunch of different stages around Golden Gate Park. Regardless of what type of music was being played, each stage had one thing in common: Someone (or lots of people) were standing close to the stage with their phones hoisted to take pictures and shoot video, obstructing the view of everyone behind them. As a shorter person, I experienced the vast majority of the shows during the weekend by watching them through someone’s phone screen. Besides being obnoxious, turns out there’s also not much of a point to filming everything.

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Dining Out? They’re Playing With Your Mind – MAELSTROM MARKETING

You sit down at an upscale restaurant and scan the menu, banter with the waiter, and make your selection. You feel sure you’ve chosen what you want, based on your appetite, your budget, or your culinary preferences. But have you really? Behind the scenes, some restaurants have cleverly designed their menus to steer you towards […]

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Feeling bad about feeling bad can make you feel worse: Embracing your darker moods can actually make you feel better in the long run, psychologists find. — ScienceDaily

Pressure to feel upbeat can make you feel downbeat, while embracing your darker moods can actually make you feel better in the long run, according to new research.

Πηγή: Feeling bad about feeling bad can make you feel worse: Embracing your darker moods can actually make you feel better in the long run, psychologists find. — ScienceDaily